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 - Clinical Medicine (Core Departments) - Department of Respiratory Care and Sleep Control Medicine
Respiratory Care and Sleep Control Medicine
Contributed Chairs
The Department of Respiratory Care and Sleep Control Medicine is a new department which was started on April 1, 2008. The purpose of the department is to investigate the blood gas levels which are essential to life. One of our key research areas is hypoxemia with or without hypercapnia, and research in this department includes 1) refractory acute respiratory failure, including acute respiratory distress syndrome, 2) sleep disordered breathing such as sleep apnea, which has a significant effect on life-style related diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, and 3) sleep associated symptoms such as excessive daytime sleepiness. From translational research, we hope to develop a new therapy for respiratory failure and sleep disordered breathing.

  Kazuo Chin (Hwa Boo Jin) M.D., Ph.D.
Professor
Research and Education
Based on pulmonary physiology such as the regulation of breathing while awake and asleep, gas exchange, and lung mechanics, the purpose of the Department of Respiratory Care and Sleep Control Medicine is to investigate blood gas levels which are essential life. From translational research, we hope to develop new therapies for respiratory failure and sleep disordered breathing. In addition, this department teaches how to manage respiratory failure, sleep disordered breathing and excessive daytime sleepiness. For example, we teach how to manage acute or chronic respiratory failure by using oxygen, noninvasive ventilation (NIV) such as continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) and adapted servo ventilation (ASV), and intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) via tracheostomy or intubation (Figure 1). Recently, it has been shown that intermittent and/or sustained hypoxia (IH and/or SH), which are induced by sleep disordered breathing such as sleep apnea, have significant effects on morbidity and mortality through transcriptional factors such as NFkappaB and hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). We will research the effects of IH and SH using molecular biology and new techniques (Figure 2). We’ll also investigate the pathophysiological effects of IH and SH on humans and animals by using noninvasive methods such as polysomnography. Through such research we will determine the effects of IH and SH on refractory respiratory failure, metabolic syndrome (Figure 3), and life-style related diseases such as cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus. In the near future, we will want to make personalized medicine for sleep disturbance including sleep disordered breathing. We also hope to develop new machines and drugs which manage several refractory respiratory failures, including acute respiratory distress syndrome and pulmonary fibrosis (Figure 4).


Respiratory Care and Sleep Control Medicine
Professor Kazuo Chin (Hwa Boo Jin)
Associate
 Professor


Toru Oga
Assistant
 Professor


Takefumi Hitomi,
Chikara Yoshimura
TEL +81-75-751-3852
FAX +81-75-751-3854
e-mail chinkkuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp
Respiratory complications in children following living donor liver transplantation improved by using noninvasive positive pressure ventilation.
A machine which can produce intermittent and sustained hypoxia in several cells.
Abdominal adipose tissue accumulation and serum leptin levels decrease after CPAP treatment
Effects of PGF2alpha on proliferation and collagen production of lung fibroblasts.
Recent Publications
1. Chihara Y, Egawa H, Tsuboi T, Oga T, Handa T, Yamamoto K, Mishima M, Tanaka K, Uemoto S, Chin K. Immediate noninvasive ventilation may improve mortality in patients with hepatopulmonary syndrome after liver transplantation. Liver Transpl 2011; 17: 144-148.
2. Harada Y, Oga T, Chin K, Takegami M, Takahashi K, Sumi K, Nakamura T, Nakayama-Ashida Y, Minami I, Horita S, Oka Y, Wakamura T, Fukuhara S, Mishima M, Kadotani H. Effects of the presence of hypertension on the relationship between obstructive sleep apnoea and sleepiness. J Sleep Res 2011; 20: 538-543.
3. Chin K, Oga T, Takahashi K, Takegami M, Nakayama-Ashida Y, Wakamura T, Sumi K, Nakamura T, Horita S, Oka Y, Minami I, Fukuhara S, Kadotani H. Associations between obstructive sleep apnea, metabolic syndrome, and sleep duration, as measured with an actigraph, in an urban male working population in Japan. Sleep 2010; 33: 89-95.
4. Aihara K, Chin K, Oga T, Takahashi K, Hitomi T, Takegami M, Handa T, Niimi A, Tsuboi T, Mishima M. Long-term nasal continuous positive airway pressure treatment lowers blood pressure in patients with obstructive sleep apnea regardless of age. Hypertens Res 2010; 33: 1025-1031.
5. Oga T, Matsuoka T, Yao C, Nonomura K, Kitaoka S, Sakata D, Kita Y, Tanizawa K, Taguchi Y, Chin K, Mishima M, Shimizu T, Narumiya S. Prostaglandin F2α receptor signaling facilitates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis independently of transforming growth factor-β. Nat Med 2009; 15: 1426-1430.